• IP BLAWG

    Over-Release Leads to Over-Regret

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 11 July 2017

    The good news is that the parties settled their trade secret litigation. The bad news is the release language in the settlement agreement. Security Camera Warehouse, Inc. sued Bowman, one of its former owners, for trade secret misappropriation. During the settlement negotiations, unbeknownst to Security Camera, Bowman still had access to Security Camera’s servers and downloaded Security Camera’s trade secrets. After the parties signed a settlement agreement, Bowman set up a new company and competed with Security Camera using the information he took during settlement negotiations. Security Camera brought a second suit against Bowman for trade secret misappropriation. The court held that Security Camera’s claims were barred by the release in the settlement agreement from the first case. The language specifically released Bowman from any claims that Security Camera may have in the future based on events that occurred before the execution of the settlement agreement.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. The troubling part of this decision is that Bowman apparently committed trade secret misappropriation while seeking to settle with Security Camera. So Bowman knew a material fact that he withheld from Security Camera. Perhaps the judge should have addressed this situation before coming to his decision. Be that as it may, there are several options to avoid this outcome. First, include representations and warranties in the settlement agreement where defendant affirmatively states that he is not in possession of any trade secrets belonging to the plaintiff. Second, include a requirement that the defendant destroy or return all copies of the trade secret (digital or otherwise) and provide an affidavit confirming compliance. Third, and most importantly, do not release unknown future claims.

  • IP BLAWG

    Horton Hears a Vulcan

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 27 June 2017

    A Star Trek and Dr. Seuss mashup will Live Long and Prosper. Comics legend, Ty Templeton, and Star Trek’s “Trouble with Tribbles Episode” writer, David Gerrold, collaborated on a comic called “Oh, The Places You'll Boldly Go.” The comic mashed Dr. Seuss-like drawings and dialogue with Star Trek characters. The Dr. Seuss Estate sent Templeton and Gerrold a cease and desist letter citing trademark and copyright infringement. This resulted in Kickstarter shutting down the campaign to fund the development of the comic. Litigation ensued. Victory goes to Templeton and Gerrold. A California court ruled against Dr. Seuss on the trademark claim. The court held that Templeton and Gerrold’s use of the Dr. Seuss trademarks was ‘nominative fair use’. Although the court didn’t rule yet on the copyright claims, the court indicated that the use of Dr. Seuss’ copyrighted works was sufficiently transformative to be fair use.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Fair use can be a defense to both trademark and copyright infringement. For trademarks, ‘nominative fair use’ means using the trademark of another in a non-commercial manner. In creative works, such as this one, the comic uses the trademark only to reference Dr. Seuss’ goods and services and not to sell a competing product or confuse the public as to the source of the products. For copyrights, fair use in a creative work is an important element in parody. A proper parody uses a source work in a completely new or unexpected way. This is referred to as “transformative use”. Caution. There’s always a fine line between fair use and infringing use. When in doubt, get an attorney’s opinion.

  • IP BLAWG

    Not So Boring Insurance News

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 20 June 2017

    My advertising injury may not be your advertising injury. Many general business insurance policies cover defense of claims for ‘advertising injury.’ But what does that mean exactly? This comes up when the insured is sued for IP infringement and tenders the defense to the insurance company. Then the insurance company refuses to defend the claim because it doesn’t fit into the definition of advertising injury. In recent cases, the courts were able to give some guidance on how to analyze the duty to defend "advertising injury". Here are a few examples. In Diamond State Insurance v. 21 Century, the court held that defendant’s false and misleading statements in telephone calls to its competitor’s customers fell within the definition of advertising injury. In Sentry Insurance v. Provide Commerce Inc., the court held that the defendant’s use of Google search terms to redirect users to a competitor’s website could conceivably fall within the definition of advertising injury. In Mid-Continent Cas. Co. v. Kipp Flores Architects LLC, the court held that claims for copyright infringement stemming from an advertising idea were covered. In Sentinel Insurance Co. Ltd. v. ITD, the court held that claims of trade secret misappropriation do not fall within the definition of advertising injury.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Insurance policies are written to "giveth" and then "taketh away". They give coverage and then list exclusions from coverage. All insurance policies should be carefully reviewed. If the extent of coverage is unclear, an insurance professional or counsel familiar with insurance coverage should be consulted. If potential litigation isn’t covered, the business owner should inquire about the costs of a rider for additional coverage. It wouldn’t hurt to also ask whether opinions of counsel or changes in business methods can help reduce premiums. IP litigation is costly and time consuming. So the premiums might be worth the additional coverage.

  • IP BLAWG

    Home Sweet Copyright

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 13 June 2017

    Copyright only protects the non-standard elements of an architectural plan. Architectural plans, by their nature, incorporate elements that have been in the public domain for centuries, such as doors, windows and types of rooms in a house. Copyright Law calls those standard elements “scènes à faire”. Home developers use a combination of standard elements to create floor plans. Sometimes, the developer comes up with a unique feature. When that happens, the developer has a copyright in the unique feature. The plaintiff in Design Basics LLC v. Lexington Homes, Inc., publishes home floor plans and licenses them on a retail basis. Design Basics sued Lexington Homes for copyright infringement of its floor plans. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed summary judgment in Lexington Homes’ favor. The Court agreed with the District Court that a jury could not find that Lexington Homes’ plans were substantially similar to Design Basics’ plans. The graphic to the left illustrates the point by juxta positioning a Design Basics floor plan with a Lexington Homes floor plan. If you take the scènes à faire out of the equation, Design Basics seems to have very little protectable elements. But there’s more. The Court, in dicta, discussed Design Basics' litigation history and used the opportunity to criticize Intellectual Property trolls. As of April 2017, Design Basics had brought over 100 copyright infringement lawsuits. Design Basics trawled the Internet and paid employees to find "infringers". The Court expressed distaste for this type of wholesale litigation. The Court reproached plaintiffs, i.e. Intellectual Property trolls, who misuse the legal system by filing dubious lawsuits for the purpose of prompting settlements to avoid costly litigation.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. There are two lessons here. First, if you are in the business of producing works that have minimal copyright protection, the chances are that you are going to have little success in bringing infringement suits. Second, the Intellectual Property troll phenomenon is on the radar of many courts. The Design Basics opinion referenced scholarly articles, news media coverage and recent opinions deploring the abuse of the court system by Intellectual Property trolls. The best way to deal with Intellectual Property trolls is to stand up to them. It may be costly but settling with Intellectual Property trolls only encourages them.

  • IP BLAWG

    Audit: The 4-Letter Word with 5-Letters

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 06 June 2017

    The USPTO’s audit procedure sets up a ‘use it or lose it’ proposition. The owner of a registered trademark has to file a declaration of use between the 5th and 6th year after registration and then on every 10th anniversary of registration. The USPTO will conduct random audits of about 10% of the filed declarations of use. The USPTO’s audit system will maintain the integrity of the trademark registration system by insuring that a trademark is actually being used for the registered goods and services. If the trademark owner cannot provide sufficient specimens of use, the goods or services will be deleted from the trademark registration.

    **WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. **Over time, a trademark owner may drop or develop new goods or services. When it comes time to file maintenance and renewal documents, the specimens of use will change too. A trademark owner can avoid audit problems by conducting a detailed review of their registrations before filing maintenance and renewal documents. If product lines or services are no longer being offered, the maintenance and renewal documents should reflect the changes.

  • IP BLAWG

    Genericide Prevention

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 23 May 2017

    Google avoided the ignominious fate of losing its trademark due to genericide. Trademark protection extinguishes when the trademark becomes interchangeable with the name of the product or service. This process is called “genericide”. Some famous examples of genericide are aspirin for pain reliever, cellophane for plastic wrap and thermos for a vacuum flask. Two people filed a proceeding with the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) to cancel the Google trademark due to it having become a generic word for searching on the Internet. The TTAB denied the cancellation and the plaintiffs appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court affirmed the TTAB. The Court’s opinion stated that even though the public might use the term as a verb, the Google mark could still serve as a source identifier.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. When developing a brand, a company should set a policy for how a trademark will be used. Companies like Xerox and Kimberly-Clark zealously protect their brand names from genericide. Xerox’s policy requires references to “Xerox brand copiers”. Kimberly-Clark requires references to “Kleenex brand tissues”. Brand usage policies can also dictate consistent use of the color, size or content to make sure the brand sends a consistent message. No matter the size of the company or the fame of the brand, it’s never too early to set a branding policy.

  • Benefits Bulletin

    Business Succession - Is There Another Way?

    Andrew S. Williams
    Thursday, 18 May 2017

    You’re a successful business owner and you’d like to plan ahead. Professionals are urging you to prepare a “succession plan” – but you look at it as a retirement plan. Getting out of the daily grind might be nice, but giving up your life’s work and your legacy business? Maybe not so nice. No matter how they sugar coat it, “succession planning” looks like you’re calling it quits.

    Whether they call it a succession plan, an exit plan or a retirement plan, it usually amounts to a transaction where you cash in your chips and your legacy business goes away. And, as soon as you sign that transaction document, you may no longer have any input in the conduct of your own business.

    Is there another way? Can you cash your chips, continue your legacy business and still have a hands-on role? Can you have your cake and eat it too? The answer for you very well may be “yes!”

    An employee stock ownership plan (“ESOP”) may allow you to sell your business to your employees in a non-adversarial, tax-advantaged transaction and continue to manage operations by electing directors of your choosing. You can participate in the business as much or as little as you would like. Want to taper off over the next ten years or so? No problem!

    In this way, ESOPs can treat the two major non-financial issues facing business owners “in transition”: the end of the business involvement of a lifetime, and the likely loss of the legacy business itself.

    The Takeaway: If a business transition is in your future, make sure an ESOP purchase is on your short list.

  • IP BLAWG

    Spooky Trademark Spirits

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 09 May 2017

    Dan Aykroyd’s Crystal Head Vodka gets to keep its dress. Crystal Head Vodka’s maker, Globefull, Inc. brought a trade dress suit against Elements Spirits Inc. for copying its distinctive Day of the Dead inspired packaging on Element’s Kah Tequila. And then the 7 year odyssey began. Globefull lost the first jury trial. It appealed the denial of its motion for a new trial. The Ninth Circuit agreed that the trial was unfair because defense counsel had referenced similar litigation in Mexico in closing argument. Back in district court, Globefull lost its motion for preliminary injunction. But Globefull persevered. During the second trial, the owner of the elements was caught in a lie. At the previous trial, she testified she never heard of Crystal Head Vodka when she was developing Kah Tequila. In the second trial, the testimony of other witnesses contradicted that statement. The jury found in favor of Globefull on liability. The amount of damages will be set at a later date.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Sometimes, litigation can feel like a never ending spiral of defeat. But, a party who is secure in its position and is willing to fight for it can win the day. Position security arises from preparation and follow through. For the preparation side, due diligence is a must so you don’t encounter unexpected surprises. On the follow through side, perseverance can win the day.

  • IP BLAWG

    First Sale Doctrine Ran Out of Time

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 02 May 2017

    A repaired Rolex may not be a Rolex. In Trademark Law, the “First Sale Doctrine” allows a consumer who buys a trademarked item to resell it without having to pay a license fee. But there are limits. In Rolex Watch USA, Inc. v. Krishan Agarwal, the defendant refurbished Rolex watches and then resold under the trademarked name. When Rolex sued him for trademark infringement, Agarwal asserted the affirmative defense of the First Sale Doctrine. The court rejected the argument. The court examined the impact of the modifications on the original product. If the modifications create a new product, it can no longer be sold using the trademark. In this case, Agarwal replaced dials and bracelets that weren’t authentic Rolex items. Agarwal offered to include a disclaimer. But the court held that the disclaimer would be confusing because the refurbished watch was really a new product.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. A business can thrive on providing aftermarket enhancements, refurbishments or changes. However, when dealing with branded goods, the changes can go too far and then resale can result in exposure to liability.

  • IP BLAWG

    Abstract Doesn’t Equal A Patent

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 25 April 2017

    Abstracts are nice in visual arts but not in patents. Before Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International, about 30% of software patent applications were invalidated. After Alice, the statistic is up to about 80%. Another one just went down. In Clarilogic, Inc. FormFree Holdings Corp., the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed summary judgment for the plaintiff to invalidate the defendant’s patent for credit reporting software. The Court ruled that the software "is directed to the abstract idea of gathering financial information of potential borrowers." The patent used computers to automate a fundamental financial information process without identifying any particular algorithm engine.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. A software developer should ask two questions before pursuing a patent. First, am I developing something that automates a task a human can do manually? Second, can any computer do what I’m automating without my software? If the answer is yes to both questions, then a patent will probably not be issued. Of course, to be safe, always get an opinion from a patent attorney whose area of emphasis is in the software patent space.

  • IP BLAWG

    Hands Off My Negative Reviews

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 18 April 2017

    A new law prohibits blocking negative reviews. On March 14, 2017, the Consumer Review Fairness Act of 2016 went into effect. The Act prohibits a company from using a ‘form contract’ to prohibit or restrict a person from posting a review, performance assessment, or other similar analysis of a company’s goods, services, or conduct. The Act also prohibits a company from requiring an individual to transfer intellectual property rights in the review or feedback to the company. Any form contract containing the prohibited language is void and can subject the company to a penalty or fee imposed by the Federal Trade Commission. The Act also creates a private right of action that can be brought by a State’s attorney general on behalf of the residents of the State.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. The Act was obviously designed to stop a growing trend by companies to squelch negative feedback by contract. This would be a good time to revisit your terms of use for your website and any form contracts, policies or other standardized terms referring to user-posted reviews or similar content. Any clause prohibited by the act should be removed or amended so it doesn’t violate the act.

  • IP BLAWG

    Marathon Gets Frozen Out

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 04 April 2017

    The common law trademark rights of an Antarctic marathon organizer got a chilly reception from the TTAB. Beginning in 1995, Marathon Tours, Inc. (“MTI”) organized sporadic cold weather marathons using the name “Antarctic Marathon”. Richard Donovan started his Antarctic marathon tours in 2006. Unlike MTI, Donovan’s tours were an annual event and have been well publicized and attended. When Donovan sought to register “Antarctic Ice Marathon and 100 k” and it’s graphic design, MTI opposed registration before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (“TTAB”) claiming prior common law rights. Everyone agreed that “Antarctic” and “Marathon” were descriptive words. So, for MTI to prevail, it would have to show that its use of “Antarctic Marathon” had acquired distinctiveness through continued use. All MTI could show was its sales and advertising, without context for the numbers, and four unsolicited articles from the media right before some events. The TTAB concluded that MTI failed to meet the burden of showing acquired distinctiveness and dismissed the opposition.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. A trademark owner can establish common law rights in a trademark by continued use in the market place. But when it comes to enforcing those common law rights against a registered trademark, the common law owner can experience an uphill battle. For any business that is not local in nature, federal trademark registration helps establish priority of use and protect the trademark owner from latecomers.

  • Benefits Bulletin

    Your Fiduciary Duty - And What To Do About It

    Andrew S. Williams
    Monday, 03 April 2017

    If your organization sponsors a 401(k) or other retirement plan, you or someone in your organization is a fiduciary to that plan. You may have hired a service provider to administer the plan (a third party administrator, or “TPA”), but the buck stops with your organization. This is because the fine print in your TPA’s service agreement says the official “Plan Administrator” is the employer, not the TPA. This means the employer has the ultimate responsibility for the plan’s ERISA compliance.

    On the investment side, the plan’s trustee or investment committee will be a responsible plan fiduciary. The investment fiduciary must act with the care, skill, prudence and diligence of a prudent person “familiar with such matters.”

    This is a prudent expert standard. So ask yourself, do the people making investment decisions for your plan have a financial or investment background? If not, you need to consider engaging a professional investment advisor to assist with investment decisions.

    What does all this mean to you?

    Plan fiduciaries do not have to make perfect decisions but they do need to exercise diligence in their deliberation on both administrative and investment matters. It is always advisable to document fiduciary deliberations as the best defense to a claim of fiduciary misconduct. Remember, good intentions never justify fiduciary misconduct including any inattention to fiduciary duties. As one federal judge put it: “A pure heart and an empty head are not an acceptable substitute for proper analysis.”

    There are other steps that plan sponsors take to help their plan fiduciaries:

    • Hire an investment advisor, adopt an investment policy statement – and follow it!
    • Meet with your investment advisor at least annually to review plan investments – and document these discussions.
    • Perform self-help compliance checkups for your plans using IRS and Department of Labor websites.
    • Consider fiduciary insurance (that’s not the plan’s ERISA fidelity bond).
    • Get professional help when you need it, and consider using independent legal counsel to assure the confidentiality of sensitive plan-related information.

    The Takeaway: Take another look at the bullet points immediately above. Is there any good reason not to follow each of those protective steps?

  • IP BLAWG

    Spring 2017 Updates

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 28 March 2017

    In case you’re curious about what happened after, here’s an update from a previous post.

    IP Criminal Hall of Fame, Grand Prize Winner, the Prenda Law Firm (January 10, 2017). As you may recall, the Prenda Law Firm, created sham companies that invited illegal downloads of porn. Then they threatened expensive and embarrassing law suits if the infringers didn’t settle. John Steele, one of the masterminds of the disgraced Prenda Law Firm, and his partner, Paul Hansmeier were indicted in January 2017. On March 8, 2017, Steele pleaded guilty to all seven counts of conspiracy to commit mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering. Court papers show that Steele and his co-defendant, Paul Hansmeier, made more than $6 million with their scheme. And, by the way, Steele and Hansmeier filmed some of their porn inventory themselves.

  • IP BLAWG

    The Intrepid Heroes of Copyright, Photographers

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 21 March 2017

    No group of artists suffers copyright infringement more than photographers. Professional and amateur photographers post their photos on the Internet to proudly display their work. Photographers have a hard time reigning in unauthorized uses of their photos. It’s hard to track unauthorized downloads, hard to find the downloaders and the damages are usually not pursuing given the costs of litigation. That’s why VHT, Inc.’s $8.3 million judgment against Zillow Group, Inc. deserves acknowledgement. VHT licenses its photos of properties that are for sale to real estate agents. The real estate agents have a license to post the photos for marketing purposes. Zillow’s infringement resulted from use of the photos outside the scope of the license in two ways. First, it left the photos on its website even after the properties were sold. Second, Zillow posted the photos on its “Diggs” website which provides home design and improvement services.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. A license has scope and parameters. The licensor has a right to limit the uses of a work. Going beyond the scope of the license creates liability for infringement.

  • IP BLAWG

    NDA Judgment is Real Reality

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 14 March 2017

    When a virtual reality tech developer leaves, the real world intercedes. Zenimax, owned by programming guru John Carmack, worked with Palmer Luckey to improve his Oculus Rift virtual reality gaming device. Zenimax allowed Luckey access to its proprietary technology. Luckey signed a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). Facebook bought Luckey’s company. Right after the sale, a group of Zenimax employees left to work with Luckey. Zenimax sued Luckey and his company seeking $4 billion for trade secret misappropriation, copyright infringement and trademark infringement. And, oh yes, breach of the NDA. After trial, the jury rejected all but the breach of the NDA claim and awarded $500 million to Zenimax.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. The problems with protecting emerging technology may have played out in this case. Sometimes, the technology can’t be pigeonholed in a specific type of Intellectual Property. Zenimax didn’t take that risk and required a NDA. As Zenimax learned, the best time to anticipate protection is at the inception of the relationship. In other words, always have a written agreement with strong contractual provisions providing protection against the unauthorized sharing of information.

  • IP BLAWG

    Danish Enzyme Bites Chinese Dragon

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 07 March 2017

    The conventional wisdom is that in a foreign company v. Chinese company patent suit, the Chinese company will always win. Maybe not. Danish company, Novozymes, had patented an enzyme for use in bioenergy and beverages. Novozymes sued two Chinese companies, Shandong Longda Bio Products and Jiangsu Boli Bioproducts for patent infringement. Novozymes brought the case in China. After six years of litigation, the Supreme People’s Court entered judgment against the Chinese companies. Two things make this victory even sweeter. First, certain types of biotechnology are harder to support under Chinese patent rules than patent rules in the U.S. and Europe. Second, the Chinese government devotes significant resources to Chinese companies’ research and development in the area of biotechnology.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. This result is not typical. That’s why it’s newsworthy. High tech innovation is always vulnerable to patent infringers who want to get there faster without the expense of research and development. Patent enforcement can be hard in foreign, and sometimes hostile, jurisdictions. For a company, patent enforcement problems can be a critical element when looking to expand into extraterritorial markets. If the Supreme People’s Court has started a trend towards protecting the patents of non-Chinese companies, new market expansion evaluations may change.

  • Benefits Bulletin

    401(k) Plan Trustees: How Do You Select And Monitor Investments?

    Andrew S. Williams
    Friday, 03 March 2017

    Many 401(k) plan sponsors have wisely selected investment professionals to assist in selecting the plan’s investment menu, typically a listing of various mutual funds. Other plan sponsors may allocate this duty to company officers and other key employees. In either case, the resident plan fiduciaries (the company officers and key employees who act on behalf of the sponsor as plan administrator or trustee) have a legal duty to “select and monitor” plan investments and, in the case of sponsors who have hired investment professionals – to monitor not only investment performance but also the performance of the investment professionals.

    So, how do you “select and monitor?”

    There’s only one hard and fast rule: Document what your investment-related decisions are and how you made them. But here are some guidelines on how to proceed:

    Selection

    • Investigate available investment providers. This may include banks, insurance companies, stockbrokers and mutual fund companies and their broad array of investment options. Then solicit specific information on several investment programs. This could be done in a standard format such as a request for proposal (RFP).
    • Analyze costs and investment characteristics of available investments and select the investment menu that offers diversified investment options at competitive prices. Remember, your plan is not “free” if your participants pay administrative costs through reduced returns on their plan investments. So, get a handle on this kind of indirect compensation (“revenue sharing”) and make sure you take it into account.

    Monitoring

    • The general requirement is endorsed by the Supreme Court in the Tibble opinion as a “separate” duty of a trustee to “monitor trust investments and remove imprudent ones.” You should review investment results on a periodic basis with a view towards replacing laggards in your plan’s investment array.
    • Compare investment results with criteria set out in your plan’s investment policy statement, or IPS (yes, having an IPS is a good idea). Also, document your decision-making process to prove that in-house plan fiduciaries have performed this duty.

    The Takeaway: Process, process, process! Just going through the procedure suggested above – and providing documentary proof – could satisfy an IRS or Department of Labor inquiry even if your plan has mediocre investment results.

  • IP BLAWG

    Blood From Insolvent Turnips

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 28 February 2017

    When all else fails, file for Chapter 11. ATopTech Inc., a software developer and Hampshire Group, Ltd., a menswear supplier, have some things in common. First, they both filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy to sell their assets. Second, Intellectual Property played a significant part in their cases. Their road to Chapter 11 was different, though. ATopTech lost a copyright action brought by Synopsys, Inc. and was facing a $30.4 million it had no hopes of paying. Hampshire Group owed $15 million to its creditors which included $7.4 million to its secured creditor, Salus Capital Partners. Hampshire Group’s primary assets are its trademarks.

    **WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. **These cases show that bankruptcy can be an effective business tool when all else fails. For ATopTech, it’s a shield against the collection efforts of a judgment-creditor. For Hampshire Group, it’s a way to maximize its assets for the benefit of creditors. Intellectual Property is considered a general intangible for bankruptcy purposes. The value of general intangibles in a bankruptcy can fluctuate dramatically. The best test for value is what a willing buyer will pay for the assets. The bankruptcy sale process can help with maximizing the value.

  • IP BLAWG

    Judge’s Campaign Wasn’t Very Judge-Like

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 21 February 2017

    False advertising in a judge’s election has consequences. West Virginia judge, Stephen Callaghan, thought it would be a great idea to literally paint a picture of his opponent partying while their county lost jobs. Callaghan Photoshopped a picture of his rival next to President Obama, gave the President a glass of beer and strewed party confetti in the background. Callaghan knew that nothing of the sort had ever happened. Turns out; using a false ad to keep your seat as a judge isn’t such a good idea. After winning the election by 220 votes, Callaghan had to face the wrath of the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia. Upon hearing about Callaghan’s campaign ad, the Court suspended Callaghan without pay for 2 years and fined him $15,000. In a written opinion, the Court stated that the ad was “in every sense, materially false.” Callaghan argued that the ad was “substantially true”, hyperbole or parody. The Court didn’t accept any of his arguments. Callaghan has now filed suit contending that the disciplinary action violated his First Amendment rights.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Callaghan’s Intellectual Property defense of fair use - - parody is thin at best. Parody can be a basis for copyright fair use. But when intersected with advertising, parody has its limits. For parody to work, it has to be clear that parody was intended. Callaghan’s ad painted his opponent in a false light in order to gain an advantage in the election. That is not fair use. Callaghan now has two years without pay to contemplate the consequences for creating a false ad in a glaring breach of ethics.

  • IP BLAWG

    Hearts and Flowers and a Black Box

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 14 February 2017

    On Valentine’s Day, expressions of love do not belong in a black box. The FTD black box may be a nice way to receive an elegant flower arrangement but it’s not a trademark. FTD wanted to register the color black on its packaging as a trademark. The examining attorney refused registration because the color was functional and non-distinctive trade dress. In other words, the proposed mark comprises a feature of the packaging for the identified goods that serves a utilitarian purpose.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. In the trademark world, something that is functional cannot be registered as a trademark. But trademark registration is available if the functional part of the trademark has a non-functional significance. Color is usually functional. But, some colors transcend the functional and are associated with the goods and services of the trademark owners. Here are some examples: UPS Brown (“Pullman Brown”); John Deer Green; Tiffany Blue; Louboutin Red (on the soles of shoes).

  • Benefits Bulletin

    Affordable Care Act (ACA) Overhaul: Step One

    Andrew S. Williams
    Friday, 03 February 2017

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has tied the hands of employers who would like to reimburse employees for the cost of their individual health insurance coverage. Under the ACA, tax-free reimbursement of employee health insurance costs was not permitted through a health reimbursement arrangement (HRA) unless it was “integrated” with an employer-provided group health plan. Stand-alone HRAs were prohibited even for small employers that were not subject to the ACA mandate to offer group health coverage.

    However, in the waning days of the Obama administration, the President signed the 21st Century Cures Act which allows “small employers” to adopt Qualified Small Employer HRAs (QSEHRAs) to reimburse covered employees for their own health insurance premiums as well as other qualified medical expenses.

    Small employer means an employer that does not employ at least 50 full-time plus “full-time equivalent” employees. In other words, employers that are not required to offer ACA coverage to their employees. Full-time employees for this purpose are those working 30 or more hours per week. If a small employer does maintain a group health plan, it cannot provide QSEHRA reimbursement benefits.

    QSEHRA benefits must be offered to all eligible employees. Some employees can be excluded (those under age 25, those who have been employed fewer than 90 days, part-time and seasonal employees). Annual reimbursement benefits are limited to $4,950.00 (individual) and $10,000.00 (family) with a proration of these limits for partial plan years. No employee contributions are permitted. Also, employees must personally maintain ACA minimum essential coverage to avoid taxable income on reimbursement benefits. There are additional employee notice and tax reporting requirements.

    The Takeaways: For small employers with employees covered by individual ACA policies, a QSEHRA can provide tax advantaged benefits at whatever benefit level the employer selects up to the permitted maximum. Qualifying employers with a young work force may find this benefit particularly attractive as it is young workers who are paying significantly increased premiums for individual ACA coverage.

    For shareholders of S corporations, their QSEHRA eligibility needs to be reviewed because of existing limits under the Internal Revenue Code on those who may have “other coverage” available through a spouse or otherwise. S corporation shareholders need to consult a tax professional if they intend to participate in their corporation’s QSEHRA. Additional guidance from the IRS on QSEHRA’s is expected, and such guidance could affect the current understanding of QSEHRA requirements.

  • IP BLAWG

    Trademarks for the Humor Impaired

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 31 January 2017

    Louis Vuitton found nothing funny about “My Other Bag is a Louis Vuitton”. My Other Bag (“MOB”) manufactured and sold canvas bags that replicate pictures of famous and expensive brands. One of its bags replicated the Louis Vuitton bag. If you look at the picture of the bag, you can see that no one would mistake this for a real Louis Vuitton bag. The bag is meant to parody high priced leather goods and that not everyone can afford them. However, Louis Vuitton did not appreciate the humor. So it sued MOB for trademark infringement, dilution by blurring and copyright infringement. The District Court granted summary judgment to MOB stating that this was an obvious attempt at humor and is not likely to cause confusion. The Second Circuit agreed and affirmed the judgment. The Second Circuit noted that “A parody must convey two simultaneous – and contradictory – messages: that it is the original, but also that it is not the original and is instead a parody”.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Parody can be the sincerest form of flattery. In fact, in the MOB case, the district court reasoned that the parody was likely to reinforce and enhance the distinctiveness and notoriety of the original brand. Understanding that parody requires a reference back to the original, how can one avoid a claim of infringement? It all boils down to the point of the use of the trademark. For instance, in Starbucks Corp. v. Wolfe’s Borough Coffee, Inc., a competitor was prohibited from using the name Charbucks for its coffee brand in order to compete with the Starbucks coffee brand. The point of Wolfe’s Borough Coffee’s Charbucks name was to compete with Starbucks. In MOB, the point was to make fun of Louis Vuitton’s luxury image.

  • IP BLAWG

    Don’t Hurt Your Fans

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 24 January 2017

    If you have a powerful brand, don’t use your power to alienate your fans. Last year, CBS and Paramount Studios sued Axanar Productions for copyright infringement. Using a 20 minute short film, Axanar had raised over $1 million through Kickstarter and Indiegogo to finance a full length fan fiction film (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1W1_8IV8uhA). The proposed film was to follow the story of Captain Kirk’s hero, Garth of Izar. CBS/Paramount, who own Star Trek, had a problem with it. This wasn’t the first fan fiction spinoff and CBS/Paramount usually encouraged it. Fan films can enlarge the universe, attract new fans and build loyalty among the current fan base. But Axanar got too close. Commentators speculate that the Axanar’s production values were too good and would have commercial potential. Star Trek fans were appalled at CBS/Paramount’s aggressive tactics. Even J.J. Abrams and Justin Lin, directors of the most recent Star Trek films, supported Axanar. CBS/Paramount tried to calm some of the bad press by coming out with guidelines for producing fan films (http://www.startrek.com/fan-films). Meanwhile, CBS/Paramount continued its lawsuit against Axanar. Last week, CBS/Paramount and Axanar announced that they have settled the dispute. In exchange for CBS/Paramount dropping the suit, Axanar has agreed to follow the fan films guidelines which include a restriction on the length of the films, requiring the use of official merchandise and keeping them family friendly.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. This is not the only instance of the perils of attacking the fans. For example, Warner Bros. tried to crack down on Harry Potter fan sites that were written primarily by children. Bowing to the bad press of picking on kids, Warner Bros. withdrew their cease and desist letters. Every content owner should be able to protect its brand and copyrights. But when pursuing protection, the content owner must be cognizant of the message it sends to its fan and consumer base and not become an IP bully.

  • IP BLAWG

    Preliminary Injunction Backfire

    Beverly A. Berneman
    Tuesday, 17 January 2017

    If you don’t own it, asking for a preliminary injunction is the wrong strategy. VitaVet Labs, Inc. sells horse vitamins. Its website was old and clunky. VitaVet hired Integrated Software Solutions, Inc. to update the site. According to the terms of the agreement, VitaVet owned the source code and had an absolute right to access it. VitaVita was to pay Integrated on an incremental basis upon receipt of deliverables. From almost the beginning, things went wrong. Integrated didn’t reach its project development goals. VitaVet paid some of the installments but VitaVet was not pleased with Integrated’s work. Meanwhile, VitaVet’s website was getting clunkier and harder to use. Integrated asserted that the software was finished but VitaVet didn’t agree. So VitaVet refused to pay the remaining installments. Integrated filed suit and sought a preliminary injunction. VitaVet countersued for a preliminary injunction seeking turnover of the source code. Usually, a preliminary injunction just maintains the status quo. The status quo was that Integrated had the source code and wouldn’t have to turn it over to VitaVet. But in this case, the trial court entered a preliminary injunction order that changed the status quo and ordered Integrated to turnover the source code to VitaVet. In affirming the decision, the California Appellate Court reasoned that the balance of equities favored disturbing the status quo in VitaVet’s favor. VitaVet owned the source code and VitaVet had a dire need to upgrade its website. So much for Integrated’s aggressive strategy against VitaVet.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. VitaVet did a lot of things right in this case. It made sure that it owned what Integrated was developing for it. When challenged, VitaVet did a great job of showing that it was entitled to extraordinary relief. On the other hand, Integrated might have done well to think things through before going after VitaVet in the first place.