• IP BLAWG

    I'm Dreaming of a White ...

    Beverly A. Berneman
    12/18/18

    I’m Dreaming of a White ...

    Wait, can I sing that without paying a royalty?  These days, we start hearing Christmas songs right after Halloween. Some holiday songs are in the public domain; while others are still protected by copyright. If the song is protected by copyright, it earns a royalty. How can you tell which songs are “free” and which are not? Copyright Law protects works of authorship for a limited number of years namely life in being of the author plus 70 years. After that, the works fall into the public domain. Still can’t tell? You better not shout, you better not cry, IP News for Business will give you a non-exhaustive guide:

    In the public domain: Come all Ye Faithful; Deck the Halls; Hark, the Herald Angles Sing; Jingle Bells; Joy to the World; O Little Town of Bethlehem; Silent Night; The First Noel; The Twelve Days of Christmas; Toyland; We Wish You a Merry Christmas.

    Not in the public domain: A Holly Jolly Christmas; Frosty the Snowman; Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas; I’ll Be Home for Christmas; Jingle Bell Rock; Let it Snow, Let it Snow, Let it Snow; Little Drummer Boy; Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer; Santa Clause is Coming to Town; Silver Bells; Sleigh Ride; Winter Wonderland; White Christmas.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Have a joyful and music filled holiday season.

  • IP BLAWG

    No Resurrection for Rejected Licenses

    Beverly A. Berneman
    12/11/18

    Sometimes the long road of Intellectual Property infringement ends up in Bankruptcy Court. Then the normal rules can change. Tech Pharmacy Services, who owned patents for pharmaceutical dispensing machines sued Provider Meds LLC and its affiliated companies for patent infringement. The parties ended up settling. As part of the settlement, Tech Pharmacy licensed the patents to Provider Meds. The Provider Meds' companies filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization cases. The cases were later converted to Chapter 7 liquidation cases and a Chapter 7 trustee was appointed. But, Provider Meds somehow managed to not list the patent license on their bankruptcy schedules. The Chapter 7 trustee had 60 days from the date of conversion of the cases to assume the licenses. Since the trustee didn’t know about the licenses, the trustee didn’t assume them. Since they weren’t assumed, they were deemed rejected by operation of law. Rejection means that Tech Pharmacy would no longer have to honor the license agreements. The Chapter 7 trustee sold Provider Meds’ assets to RPD Holdings. Imagine RPD’s surprise when it realized the sale didn’t include assignment of the Tech Pharmacy patent licenses. RPD appealed. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the lower court rulings that the rejected licenses couldn’t be resurrected.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Here lies a cautionary tale. Whenever a transaction involves a party who is a debtor in bankruptcy, land mines abound. This case went wrong in a number of ways. First of all, the bankruptcy petitions omitted material information about their patent licenses. Second, the Chapter 7 trustee was kept in the dark and ended up involuntarily rejecting valuable patent licenses. Third, RPD erroneously assumed it was getting the licenses along with the other assets thereby violating the 11th Commandment, “Thou Shalt Not Assume.”

  • IP BLAWG

    Cutting in the Trademark Line

    Beverly A. Berneman
    12/4/18

    Updating a trademark can be risky if someone else gets in ahead of you. Inn at St. Johns, LLC registered its name “5ive Restaurant” in logo form. So far so good. Eleven years later, St. Johns decided to update its trademark to 5ive Steakhouse in logo form. But St. Johns got derailed. Three years after St. Johns registered its first trademark, OTG Management Inc. registered 5Steak. (All 3 mark drawings appear to the left). The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) refused registration of St. Johns’ 5ive Steakhouse due to a likelihood of confusion with the OTG’s 5Steak registration. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board affirmed the refusal.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS.  What, if anything, could St. Johns have done to avoid this outcome? First, St. Johns could have monitored the USPTO to see if any applications were being filed to register similar trademarks and then oppose the registrations. There are services that will monitor the records for you. Some can be costly; others not so much. Second, St. Johns could have set up an alert on a search engine to let it know if anyone is using a similar mark on a common law basis. This could have given St. Johns a heads up about 5Steak in time to do something about it. Third, before applying to register the updated trademark, St. Johns could have conducted due diligence, discovered 5Steak and perhaps, worked something out with them.