• IP BLAWG

    Blood From Insolvent Turnips

    Beverly A. Berneman
    2/28/17

    When all else fails, file for Chapter 11. ATopTech Inc., a software developer and Hampshire Group, Ltd., a menswear supplier, have some things in common. First, they both filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy to sell their assets. Second, Intellectual Property played a significant part in their cases. Their road to Chapter 11 was different, though. ATopTech lost a copyright action brought by Synopsys, Inc. and was facing a $30.4 million it had no hopes of paying. Hampshire Group owed $15 million to its creditors which included $7.4 million to its secured creditor, Salus Capital Partners. Hampshire Group’s primary assets are its trademarks.

    **WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. **These cases show that bankruptcy can be an effective business tool when all else fails. For ATopTech, it’s a shield against the collection efforts of a judgment-creditor. For Hampshire Group, it’s a way to maximize its assets for the benefit of creditors. Intellectual Property is considered a general intangible for bankruptcy purposes. The value of general intangibles in a bankruptcy can fluctuate dramatically. The best test for value is what a willing buyer will pay for the assets. The bankruptcy sale process can help with maximizing the value.

  • IP BLAWG

    Judge’s Campaign Wasn’t Very Judge-Like

    Beverly A. Berneman
    2/21/17

    False advertising in a judge’s election has consequences. West Virginia judge, Stephen Callaghan, thought it would be a great idea to literally paint a picture of his opponent partying while their county lost jobs. Callaghan Photoshopped a picture of his rival next to President Obama, gave the President a glass of beer and strewed party confetti in the background. Callaghan knew that nothing of the sort had ever happened. Turns out; using a false ad to keep your seat as a judge isn’t such a good idea. After winning the election by 220 votes, Callaghan had to face the wrath of the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia. Upon hearing about Callaghan’s campaign ad, the Court suspended Callaghan without pay for 2 years and fined him $15,000. In a written opinion, the Court stated that the ad was “in every sense, materially false.” Callaghan argued that the ad was “substantially true”, hyperbole or parody. The Court didn’t accept any of his arguments. Callaghan has now filed suit contending that the disciplinary action violated his First Amendment rights.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. Callaghan’s Intellectual Property defense of fair use - - parody is thin at best. Parody can be a basis for copyright fair use. But when intersected with advertising, parody has its limits. For parody to work, it has to be clear that parody was intended. Callaghan’s ad painted his opponent in a false light in order to gain an advantage in the election. That is not fair use. Callaghan now has two years without pay to contemplate the consequences for creating a false ad in a glaring breach of ethics.

  • IP BLAWG

    Hearts and Flowers and a Black Box

    Beverly A. Berneman
    2/14/17

    On Valentine’s Day, expressions of love do not belong in a black box. The FTD black box may be a nice way to receive an elegant flower arrangement but it’s not a trademark. FTD wanted to register the color black on its packaging as a trademark. The examining attorney refused registration because the color was functional and non-distinctive trade dress. In other words, the proposed mark comprises a feature of the packaging for the identified goods that serves a utilitarian purpose.

    WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS. In the trademark world, something that is functional cannot be registered as a trademark. But trademark registration is available if the functional part of the trademark has a non-functional significance. Color is usually functional. But, some colors transcend the functional and are associated with the goods and services of the trademark owners. Here are some examples: UPS Brown (“Pullman Brown”); John Deer Green; Tiffany Blue; Louboutin Red (on the soles of shoes).

  • Benefits Bulletin

    Affordable Care Act (ACA) Overhaul: Step One

    Andrew S. Williams
    2/3/17

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has tied the hands of employers who would like to reimburse employees for the cost of their individual health insurance coverage. Under the ACA, tax-free reimbursement of employee health insurance costs was not permitted through a health reimbursement arrangement (HRA) unless it was “integrated” with an employer-provided group health plan. Stand-alone HRAs were prohibited even for small employers that were not subject to the ACA mandate to offer group health coverage.

    However, in the waning days of the Obama administration, the President signed the 21st Century Cures Act which allows “small employers” to adopt Qualified Small Employer HRAs (QSEHRAs) to reimburse covered employees for their own health insurance premiums as well as other qualified medical expenses.

    Small employer means an employer that does not employ at least 50 full-time plus “full-time equivalent” employees. In other words, employers that are not required to offer ACA coverage to their employees. Full-time employees for this purpose are those working 30 or more hours per week. If a small employer does maintain a group health plan, it cannot provide QSEHRA reimbursement benefits.

    QSEHRA benefits must be offered to all eligible employees. Some employees can be excluded (those under age 25, those who have been employed fewer than 90 days, part-time and seasonal employees). Annual reimbursement benefits are limited to $4,950.00 (individual) and $10,000.00 (family) with a proration of these limits for partial plan years. No employee contributions are permitted. Also, employees must personally maintain ACA minimum essential coverage to avoid taxable income on reimbursement benefits. There are additional employee notice and tax reporting requirements.

    The Takeaways: For small employers with employees covered by individual ACA policies, a QSEHRA can provide tax advantaged benefits at whatever benefit level the employer selects up to the permitted maximum. Qualifying employers with a young work force may find this benefit particularly attractive as it is young workers who are paying significantly increased premiums for individual ACA coverage.

    For shareholders of S corporations, their QSEHRA eligibility needs to be reviewed because of existing limits under the Internal Revenue Code on those who may have “other coverage” available through a spouse or otherwise. S corporation shareholders need to consult a tax professional if they intend to participate in their corporation’s QSEHRA. Additional guidance from the IRS on QSEHRA’s is expected, and such guidance could affect the current understanding of QSEHRA requirements.