• June 1, 2012 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    With summer temperatures upon us, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) has a public awareness campaign to prevent workplace injuries related to heat. OSHA does not have a specific standard for working in heat, but, under federal law, employers have a duty to protect workers from serious hazards in the workplace, including heat-related hazards.

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  • June 1, 2012 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    There may be a new trend in lawsuits being brought by employees who worked as unpaid interns.

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  • June 1, 2012 Newsletters
    • What are An Employer’s Obligations Under “ObamaCare”?
    • The America Invents Act - Big Changes for Inventors
    • Employment Law Alerts
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  • March 2, 2012 Publications
    Turnaround Management Association's "Journal of Corporate Renewal"

    Turnaround Management Association's March 2012 issue of "Journal of Corporate Renewal"

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  • March 1, 2012 News
    Reorganization & Bankruptcy

    Bankruptcy comes in several flavors, and a Chapter 11 is the flavor that allows a business to reorganize and continue to operate. Can small businesses benefit from filing a Chapter 11 bankruptcy? YES! And here’s why:

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  • March 1, 2012 News

    Over 50% of the population does not have any estate plan. Not a will. Not a trust. Nothing. Further, of those people that have done some planning, what they have is in many cases out of date or has not been fully implemented.

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  • March 1, 2012 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    In our Winter 2012 newsletter, we discussed the groundbreaking Illinois Supreme Court opinion in Reliable Fire Equipment Company v. Arrendendo, which changed the landscape for employers looking to enforce restrictive covenants (often called non-compete and non-solicit provisions). Other courts – both state appellate and local federal courts – have begun weighing in on this case and how it will be applied on a practical level.

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  • March 1, 2012 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    Savvy employers know that two things help protect them against harassment claims: (1) a written policy against sexual harassment and discrimination; and (2) an internal complaint procedure for employees to voice any potential violations of the policy. If, however, those policies are not followed in practice, or if employees are not trained how to utilize the internal complaint procedure, employers may find themselves unprotected.

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  • March 1, 2012 News
    Intellectual Property

    Golan & Christie Partner, Beverly A. Berneman, recently taught an advanced class in Bankruptcy and Intellectual Property at the John Marshall School of Law. Beverly also teaches a course in Financing the Development of Intellectual Property. She created the curriculum for both of these unique courses and has been teaching them for 9 years.

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  • March 1, 2012 Newsletters
    • Can Small Businesses Benefit from filing for Chapter 11?
    • Why You Can’t Just Put It In a Drawer and Forget It
    • Employment Law Alerts
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  • March 1, 2012 Publications
    Federal Bar Association's "Divisions Digest"

    Federal Bar Association's Spring 2012 issue of "Divisions Digest"

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  • January 1, 2012 News

    Employment contracts containing “restrictive covenants” (a/k/a non-competition, non-solicitation or any other post-employment restriction on employee’s activities) are one of the most litigated legal issues in Illinois – and around the nation.

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  • January 1, 2012 News

    It is no secret that since 2007 real estate property values throughout the Chicagoland area have decreased drastically. Market values have plummeted for commercial, industrial and residential properties alike. Nonetheless, property taxes have remained high.

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  • January 1, 2012 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    A mobile device retailer’s lawsuit against its former employee, Noah Kravitz, raises a novel legal question about who owns a Twitter account used by an employee to comment about both personal and work topics. The employer, PhoneDog Media L.L.C., which also maintains a website and blog with reviews and news about mobile devices, alleges that Kravitz improperly kept using a company Twitter account which had accumulated more than 17,000 followers.

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  • January 1, 2012 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has again postponed the effective date of its requirement that employers post a notice to employees about their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRA covers most non-governmental employers in the United States, including non-profits and non-union businesses.

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  • January 1, 2012 Newsletters
    • Restrictive Covenant Provisions – Is Yours Enforceable?
    • The Value of Assessment Appeals
    • Employment Law Alerts
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  • September 1, 2011 News

    Merger and acquisition activity has started to rebound from the credit crisis, which inhibited the merger and acquisition market a few years ago. As the volume of deals continues to increase, buyers and sellers, now more than ever, need to carefully allocate risk and the assumption and retention of liabilities when structuring a transaction.

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  • September 1, 2011 News

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) recently started mailing “no-match letters” which inform employers that the social security number and name of one or more of their employees do not match the SSA’s records. While the letters do not look threatening, no-match letters have formed the basis for multiple criminal investigations by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and prosecutions on charges of harboring or knowingly hiring unauthorized workers. The SSA stopped sending these letters in 2008 (for tax year 2007) in response to litigation surrounding a proposed Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulation, “Safe Harbor Procedures for Employers Who Receive a No-Match Letter.” DHS later rescinded the proposed regulation.

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  • September 1, 2011 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    The Department of Labor and Internal Revenue Service recently announced a joint effort to crack down on businesses that misclassify employees as independent contractors. Historically, these agencies have not shared information or coordinated their enforcement efforts, so this represents a significant change and an increased threat to employers.

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  • September 1, 2011 News Employment Alerts
    Employment Law

    Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employers are allowed to pay their tipped employees less than the minimum wage as long as they follow certain rules. A tipped employee is a worker in a position where he or she customarily and normally receives more than $30 a month worth of tips. The difference between the hourly-salary rate paid by the employer and the standard federal minimum wage is what we call a tip credit. In Illinois, for example, where the minimum wage is $8.25, tipped employees can be paid as little as $4.95 per hour if the tip credit rules are followed.

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  • September 1, 2011 News

    In this extremely competitive, and often unrelenting economy, a well-established trademark can help your business thrive in the marketplace. By simply taking the time to build your brand, you will increase customer loyalty and attract new business.

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  • September 1, 2011 Newsletters
    • Diligently Do Your Due Diligence
    • Beware if "No-Match" Letters and Criminal Liability
    • Employment Law Alerts
    • Building and Protecting Your Brand
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  • July 1, 2011 Publications
    Landslide

    Landslide

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  • June 1, 2011 News

    Business and personal lives move fast, and most of us agree there are just not enough hours in the day to attend to every detail. Checking the monthly bank statement for accuracy seems like the last thing on the list. Failing to do it, though, or assigning the task to an employee (especially one who can write checks) can leave you with little recourse if you are the victim of fraud.

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  • June 1, 2011 News

    A qualified employee benefit plan (e.g. Pension, Profit Sharing, 401(K) and 403(b) plans), protects the value of an employee’s account because it is exempt from the claims of creditors, including a trustee in bankruptcy. This benefit has also been extended to Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), although in bankruptcy, the exemption is limited to $1,000,000. Creditor protection applies to IRAs which hold funds that were “rolled over” from a qualified Pension, Profit Sharing, 401(K) or 403(b) plan. Finally, an IRA in which a spouse is named as a beneficiary is creditor protected since the spouse has the right to roll over the funds into his or her own IRA.

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